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15 January 2016

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Jenny

So you print the outline of letters on one type of paper and cut them out. How do you just get the outline to print with the large font and not have solid ink? Then you cut them out and glue them onto a heavy white card stock.

I know I am restating, but I am trying to understand procedure.

My guess for the double duty card is e. Schwa.

bearing

Good guess, but wrong. We don't need to read words with upside-down "e" in them; that's for dictionaries and linguists. Anyway, the existence of the schwa is part of the Bad News portion of "learning to read in English."

I believe I used one of the font text effects in MS Word to produce an outline of the letters. Something like Century Gothic, in bold and a large font.

I just checked OpenOffice, which I use more often these days because it is so streamlined compared to Word, and it also has the outline effect.

Jenny

There's a lot of bad news when it comes to reading English.

I never thought too much about it until my oldest was learning to read and was confronted with the number one. Wow, there is nothing about how that word looks that gives you a hint about how it should sound. I guess the /n/ holds true.

Jenny

There's a lot of bad news when it comes to reading English.

I never gave it much thought until my oldest was learning to read and was confronted with the word 'one.' There is nothing about how that word looks to give any indication about how it should sound. Well, I guess the /n/ holds true.

Rebekka

Th?

Bearing

Rebekka got it.

There's really only one common way to spell the non-vocalized /th/ sound as in "bath," and only two common ways to spell the vocalized sound ("th" as in that, "the" as in bathe). I really prefer to use easier words than bathe, breathe, lathe, and loathe with a 5yo, so I go ahead and break the news to them eventually that we're going to use "th" for two different (but related) phonemes.

It functions as foreshadowing if nothing else.

GeekLady

I have two comments here:

1. The free fonts Andika and Andika New Basic are fantastic for kids. They are what I use on all my CCE handouts, and I bet they would make fantastic phonemes.

2. I have made sandpaper letters before, and I didn't find the letters that hard to cut out. I used a fairly fine grit, I'd have to double check which exactly, and a pair of old short, pointed craft scissors. Also, you can color whole sheets of sandpaper with spray enamel to get whatever color letters you want.

GeekLady

I meant to add the Andika link and forgot it. More coffee then.

http://software.sil.org/andika/

bearing

Neat! I love purpose-designed fonts.

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